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Home / News archive / From Augustus to Sigismondo, discover Rimini from Roman times to the Malatesta seignory

From Augustus to Sigismondo, discover Rimini from Roman times to the Malatesta seignory

From Augustus to Sigismondo Malatesta

Behind the famous seaside postcard of Rimini, there is a city with an ancient heart. Rimini, or the ancient Ariminum, is an art heritage city with over 22 centuries of history. More than two thousand years have passed since, in 268 B.C., the Roman Senate sent six thousand settlers who founded the city that was meant to be strategically central and to develop to this day. A Roman city to be discovered amongst Arco d’AugustoPonte di TiberioAmphitheatreporta Montanara and Domus del Chirurgo, starting from the Visitor center, a multimedia and interactive tour that will guide you in discovering the city, with its treasures and its beauty, and the surrounding land. History has passed under the Arco d'Augusto for many centuries: the two most important roads of ancient Italy met below it, the Flaminia that runs from Rome to Rimini and the via Emilia that runs from Rimini to Piacenza connecting the Adriatic Sea to the Po. After crossing Piazza Tre Martiri – the ancient Forum – from here is the bridge that Tiberius built in 14-21 A.D, in Istrian stone over the vast bed of the Marecchia, the river which, with its ancient name (Ariminum), named the city. Symbolic representation of this ancient legacy is the Domus del Chirurgo, the archaeological site opened in 2007 in the central piazza Ferrari, where you can see a third-century house in all its splendour. Prestigious mosaics and vivid frescoes depict a private residence destined in part to the medical and pharmaceutical profession, which yielded the Roman world’s richest surgical kit. Within the Roman city pulsates the mediaeval one in the colours of the paintings of the fourteenth century School of Rimini (in the Gothic church of Sant’Agostino, in the spectacular square with the Fountain and the most important public buildings on Piazza Cavour). The world does not speak of the Renaissance without Rimini, the Castle and the Temple wanted by Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta, the lord that Piero della Francesca portrayed in prayer before San Sigismondo in the fresco, signed and dated 1451 and kept in the Malatesta Temple